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vale477@libero.it

vale477@libero.it ha scritto 11 articoli per Web Burning Blog

IKEA Jerker Do-It-Yourself Treadmill Desk

IKEA Jerker Do-It-Yourself Treadmill Desk

The muscle soreness I’m experiencing today after walking around Comic-Con all weekend made me realize: I’ve got to incorporate more standing and walking into my daily routine. Maybe a treadmill desk ? There are some expensive desks made to fit over a treadmill (sold separately), but someone on Hacker News modified an IKEA Jerker desk to do the job. The discontinued but beloved model of desk, which I already own , plus one of those utilitarian wire shelving units gives you a wide monitor stand with plenty of component/wire storage and keyboard and mouse room. Click on the image to see the whole setup. It’s not the prettiest thing in the world, but it looks really tempting to try. The owner says: Coding while walking works fine for me. As far as the mechanics, it’s not hard to walk and type at the same time. 2MPH isn’t very fast

The “Only If We’re Offline Friends” Rule

The “Only If We’re Offline Friends” Rule

I’m active on a LOT of social/sharing webapps: Twitter , Flickr , Foursquare, Tumblr , and to a lesser degree, FriendFeed, Delicious and Buzz. While most of my posts are public and open to everyone, on Foursquare and Facebook*, I only accept friend requests from people who I know and hang out with offline. Still, I feel bad refusing friend requests from people who listen to TWiG or read Lifehacker or this blog simply because I don’t know them. What I really want, on every social network, is an optional friend request auto-responder, so that I could make it read, “You seem nice and I’m glad you want to be friends with me, but I only accept friend requests/follow back people I know offline. Sorry.” (My Facebook page is open to the public, it’s my personal profile that’s offline-friends-only.)

Google Gives HTC EVO Phones to Google I/O Attendees

Google Gives HTC EVO Phones to Google I/O Attendees

Not only did Google pre-mail Droid handsets to I/O attendees, today they gave the Sprint HTC EVO 4G out to conference attendees at the Moscone Center, with a 2GB Micro SD card filled with music. Awhile back I tweeted that I wouldn’t accept “free” phones like these, since I cover Google on TWiG and at web sites and magazines where I occasionally freelance, and accepting a “gift” from a company I talk and write about so much seemed like a bad idea. But, I’m not a full-time journalist who has to operate under the kinds of stringent rules that a New York Times reporter does. I’m a developer and independent commentator, and I’m at this conference on my own dime–no press pass, no expense account. So, I’m going back on my initial word: I did accept the phones as part of the $400 ticket price to the conference, and I plan to use them to develop for Android .




My Interview on The Pipeline

My Interview on The Pipeline

Almost every interview I do these days for podcasts or magazines involves the inevitable question: “What are your best productivity tricks?” That’s why it was so refreshing to do an interview with Dan Benjamin on his excellent show, The Pipeline, and never have to answer that question. Instead Dan wanted to chat about my progression from a day coder and no-name night blogger back in 2001 to a “pro blogger,” about what made Lifehacker a success (hint: it’s not talent, it’s a big platform and LOTS of posts over the course of years), about self-publishing books, and about what I think an aspiring blogger these days has to do to make blogging a full-time job. Good times. Check it out: The Pipeline 10: Gina Trapani

TWiG Live from SXSW

TWiG Live from SXSW

Had a blast recording the latest episode of This Week in Google in person with Jeff Jarvis and Leo Laporte in Austin at SXSW this past Saturday. We had a live audience in-studio of friends and supporters there too, with guest appearances by Matt Haughey, Adam Pash, and Jake Jarvis rotating in on the fourth mic. It was so cool to see what happens beyond my Skype headset every Saturday and finally get to give Leo a big hug in person. Speaking of Leo at SXSW, if you haven’t seen him crowdsurfing at the Diggnation party, you must get yourself to the YouTube clip of that stat.

Taking on the 750 Words March Challenge

Taking on the 750 Words March Challenge

In his web-site-turned-book Things I Have Learned in My Life So Far , Stefan Sagmeister says keeping a diary supports personal development. I couldn’t agree more. Writing is a form of thinking, and journaling is a great way to help yourself think personal issues through. I’ve fallen off the journaling wagon lately though, but inspired by former Lifehacker editor D. Keith Robinson’s tweet tonight , I’m getting back on using Buster Benson’s 750 Words webapp. The concept of 750 Words is simple: every day, you type 750 words–the equivalent of three pages–of stream of conscious, whatever you want, free writing.

It’s the Software, Stupid

It’s the Software, Stupid

“In hardware you can’t build a computer that’s twice as good as anyone else’s anymore. But you can do it in software.” — Steve Jobs in a 1994 Rolling Stone interview [ via ]

Google Versus China, According to Twitter

Google Versus China, According to Twitter

Google says it’s taking “a new approach to China” and will stop censoring search results there, even if it means they have to shut down Google.cn and their China offices. The announcement is a huge deal, and it set off some fantastic insta-commentary from tech writers on Twitter. My favorite, shown above, is courtesy of Joel Johnson . More inside. Most people’s reactions were emotional, proud, celebratory: Others dug deeper or cracked jokes. From a friend who shall remain nameless because her/his tweets are protected: From an obvious Microsoft-lover: Chinese tech writer Jacqui Cheng had the most insightful bits of the bunch.

Rendere sicura una rete Wi-Fi casalinga

Rendere sicura una rete Wi-Fi casalinga

Qualche giorno fa mi trovavo a passeggiare per le vie del centro di Vicenza, ed avevo con me il mio iPod touch che come saprete ̬ dotato di connessione wifi. Ebbene per sfizio ho provato a rilevare le reti a portata di campo e ne ho beccate ben 4. Ebbene due di queste, utilizzate da uffici Post correlati: Killer: Una scheda di rete ad alte prestazioni per online video gamers Cambiare configurazione di rete al volo con un singolo comando VMWare Workstation on Windows Vista Рproblemi di rete

L’Africa è ora cablata

L’Africa è ora cablata

da interoute.it Notizia di un paio di settimane fa, ma che è passata abbastanza in sordina. Peccato dico io, visto che si tratta di un avvenimento storico nell’ambito dell’abbattimento del digital divide in paesi meno sviluppati. In questo caso parliamo del continente nero (paraponziponzipo). In Africa fino ad oggi la connettività era garantita solamente dal satellite, e riservata Post correlati: Il team di Internet Explorer ha mandato una torta al team Firefox per festeggiare la nuova release Registrazione in tempo reale per i domini .it

How Matt Mullenweg Works

How Matt Mullenweg Works

Inc. magazine’s “The Way I Work” feature profiles Matt Mullenweg , creator of WordPress, the software that runs this site. Even though the article byline was “by Matt Mullenweg,” Matt says the reporter actually wrote the piece–so he rewrote it, in his own words, on his blog . (I love this.) Matt’s workday sounds perfect to me. He says it includes: No computer or email for an hour after he wakes up (not to an alarm clock) No meetings before 11AM Working from home six days a week, even though his office is a five-minute walk from his home Going out for long lunches (and having meetings over food) Batching his tasks to avoid context switching: all his meetings in one day, all coding TODO’s in another, all his errands in another. Interestingly, he uses RescueTime to monitor what applications he spends his day in, and also uses both a Mac and PC connected with Synergy ( like I do) . This whole article is worth a read, but get it in Matt’s words on his own blog: The Way I Work, annotated .